Sevagram

Popularly known as the village of service, Sevagram is one of the few sites in India that provide a deeper insight into the life of Mahatma Gandhi. Sevagram once served as the residence of the Mahatma during India's freedom struggle. Today, it stands as a testament to the great life lived by him and attracts tourists from all corners of the country. The ashram is divided into different parts that allow tourists to explore various nuances of the Mahatma's life. Start your trip with Adi Niwas, which was the first hut built in the ashram. Gandhiji spent his initial days at Sevagram here and its northern verandah served as his dining space. Morning and evening prayers of different religions are held till date. Located nearby is the residence of Mahatma Gandhi's wife, Kasturba Gandhi, known as Ba Kuti. The Bapu Kuti is the room where Gandhi lived. It still houses his sleeping cot along with other belongings of daily use. Then, there's Gandhiji's Secretariat from where Gandhi stayed in touch with the entire world. A telephone, a cage and a pair of wooden scissors have been put on display. The next stop should be Bapu's kitchen that houses a flour grinding machine, which was used by Gandhiji himself. Tourists must check out the Gandhi Photo Exhibition at Sevagram Ashram. The photo exhibition displays the life and works of the Mahatma. Tourists can also choose to stay at the ashram's Yatri Nivas, built by the government of India in 1982, for an immersive experience.

Sevagram

Nagardhan Fort

Lying in the periphery of the city, the ancient town of Nagardhan is best known for the majestic Nagardhan Fort. An imposing complex, this square shaped structure boasts an outer rampart with bastions and an inner wall. The main entrance gate of the fort is on its north-west side and still stands intact. A notable feature of the fort is the Pauni rampart that bears a copper plate grant of King Pravarsena II of the Vakataka dynasty, which indicates that the clay used in the construction of the fort dates back to a period much earlier than the medieval era. Tourists can also visit an underground temple in the fort that houses an idol of Goddess Durga, on what appears to be the sill of a well.

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Nagardhan Fort

Pavnar Ashram

Lying on the outskirts of the city, Pavnar is a serene and spiritual stopover. Tourists can explore the remains of a medieval fort that stands as a testament to the artistic genius of the artists of the Vakataka dynasty (250 AD to 500 AD), which made Pavnar their capital. The most popular attraction is the Paramdham Ashram that was established by Acharya Vinoba Bhave, founder of the Bhoodan Movement, in 1934. Excavations carried out during the construction of the ashram revealed numerous sculptures and idols belonging to different periods between 250 AD and 1200 AD, which are displayed at the ashram. These include the sculptures of Goddess Ganga and other sculptures depicting scenes from epics like the Mahabharata and the Ramayana.

The most striking is the one depicting the meeting of Lord Rama with his brother Bharata. On the way to the Pavnar Ashram, tourists can also visit two temples dedicated to Lord Vishnu and Lord Hanuman, respectively. The ashram is also home to the Brahma Vidya Mandir that was established by Acharya Vinoba Bhave, an Indian advocate of human rights, and is now run by women from all parts of India. A visit to the ashram introduces tourists to the life and works of Acharya Vinoba Bhave.

Pavnar Ashram

Ambagarh Fort

Bordered by verdant forests, the historic Ambagarh Fort is a prominent tourist stopover that is perched at a height of 300 ft above sea level. The fort holds appeal for trekkers, who can explore the nearby surroundings of the fort. While the structure is in ruins, its principal passages are well-preserved and tourists can make out the former grandeur of the 12th century fort. In close proximity lies a large tank right outside the fort complex, which is still used to supply water to the nearby villages.

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Ambagarh Fort

Mansar

Lying on the outskirts of the city, Mansar is a one-of-its-kind tourist stopover known for its archaeological excavations dating back to the 5th century. As you enter the gate of the archaeological site, you are welcomed by a huge mound. On reaching the top of the mound, you will come across a grid of excavated walls surrounding a sprawling pyramidal brick structure. You will be instantly reminded of the beautiful ruins of Nalanda. On climbing further, you will get a spectacular view of lush green surroundings and the Ramtek temple complex. The multi-storeyed brick structure stands at a height of 15 m and holds a plinth or adhisthana adorned with alternating niches. A sacrificial fire-pit can also be seen next to the massive structure. As you explore further, you will reach another majestic structure that served as the residence of the Vakataka king, Pravarasena II (400-415 CE), and is known as Pravarpura.

Mansar

Central Museum

Boasting a unique collection of antiquities, coins, ancient inscriptions, sculptures, inscriptions and prehistoric artefacts, Central Museum is an important tourist site. Some of these exhibits are said to be dating back to the Indus Valley civilisation. The museum is locally known as 'Ajab Bangla' and is a hidden treasure for tourists coming from different parts of the country. Established in 1862 by Sir Richard Temple, the then chief commissioner of Nagpur, the museum has a rich well-stocked library and an art gallery that has unique paintings from the Bombay school of Art. An interesting aspect of the museum is the gallery of natural history that houses trophies of antlers, fish, reptiles and invertebrates. Notable exhibits of the Great Indian Bustard and white crow are particularly interesting.

Central Museum

Raman Science centre

The Raman Science Centre is named after renowned Indian physicist and Nobel Prize Winner, Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman. It is an interactive science centre affiliated with Mumbai’s science centre and was developed to promote scientific attitude and growth of science and technology in various industries and human welfare. The science centre has abundant activities in store for visitors, which include a prehistoric animal park,  Information and Communication Technology Gallery, a science exhibition etc. It is a place where children can experience fun learning while adults can brush-up on their science knowledge along with learning new things. Tourists can also attend science lectures, science film screenings and interesting 3-D science shows. The centre organises various activities like planet watching for visitors. It remains open on all days of the week from 9.30 am to 6 pm and makes for an intriguing experience.

Raman Science centre

Dhamma Chakra stupa

The Dhamma Chakra Stupa or Deekshabhoomi is a popular Buddhist monument in Nagpur. It is an architectural marvel known for a large Buddhist stupa located inside its premises. Built by renowned architect, Sheo Dan Mal, the entire structure is made of Dholpur sandstone, marble and granite, and stands towering at a height of 120 ft . The large arched doors of the complex are adorned with the Ashok Chakra and statues of elephants, horses and lions. The massive hollow dome of the stupa is surrounded by imposing fountains, which add to the beauty and grandeur of the stupa complex.

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Dhamma Chakra stupa