Kupup Lake

A high altitude lake that resembles an elephant, Kupup Lake is one of the delights of Gangtok, and is a stop on the Silk Route tour. Also known as the Elephant Lake, it is situated at a height of 13,066 ft on the way to Jelep la Pass, bordering India and China. The right side of the lake looks like the trunk of an elephant, while the left resembles the animal's tail. Locally, the lake is recognised as Bitan Cho. 

A stunning valley holds the lake at its center, and the small village of Kupup is the nearest attraction to the lake. Another fascinating reason to visit here is the Yak Golf Course, an 18-hole course, which is the highest of its kind in the world at about 13,025 ft. It has been affiliated with the Indian Golf Union since 1985, and has even earned a place in the Guinness Book of World Records. 

Kupup Lake

Deer Park

Rightly named so, Deer Park in Gangtok is home to herds of spotted deer and antelopes. It was established in the 1950s, and since then, deer from all over Sikkim and neighbouring states are brought to this sanctuary. The park stands on a ridge on the side of the New Secretariat, and has designated trails that visitors can use to spot deer in their natural habitat.Apart from deer, one can find animals like the red panda, Himalayan bear and others in protected enclosures. The park also has a statute of Lord Buddha, where he is seen preaching truths to his disciples. In front of the statue, a butter lamp glows continuously on a bed of colourful flowers. This particular statue resembles Lord Buddha’s first sermon at the Deer Park in Sarnath, Uttar Pradesh, and represents his reincarnation as a musk deer. The serene surroundings of the park make it a great spot for one to spend time in the arms of nature.

It also known as Rustamji Park, named after Rustamji, one of the dewans of the Chogyal family of Sikkim. Rustamji is also the acclaimed author of the much loved book "Enchanted Frontiers". 

Deer Park

Banjhakri Waterfall

The Banjhakri Waterfall  plunges straight down with a loud, gushing noise, from a height of 40 ft. Surrounded by  beautifully-trimmed gardens, which are spread over 2 acre of lush land, the waterfall is one of the most serene spots in the city. Lying close to the Ranka Monastery, the waterfall is now part of an energy park, which generates unconventional sources of energy. All around, there are pavilions where one can stand and marvel at the sight of the falls. There are also foot bridges constructed in the Sikkimese style of architecture so visitors can cross from one place to another. You can indulge in boating in a man-made lake here, which hosts a statue of a dragon at its center. There are also well laid-out trails, a cafe to satisfy hunger pangs and an information kiosk for those curious about the Shaman culture. There is also a souvenir shop to splurge at. 


A Banjhakri, according to folk tales within the Nepali community in Sikkim, is a traditional healer, also translated as a jungle priest or magician. The first Ban Jhakri is said to have had the power to dispel evil spirits. 

Banjhakri Waterfall

Seven Sisters Waterfall

A series of seven waterfalls, arranged sideways on a cliff, the Seven Sisters Waterfall is one of the most beautiful sites in the Northeast. It can be seen in three distinct tiers, very clearly distinguishable from a distance. You can only view four of the seven falls from the bottom, since the other three are much higher up. A small footbridge wounds its way across the stream and tourists can enjoy the refreshing sight at close quarters.The place is particularly attractive during monsoon (in the months of June and July) when the falls are imbued with an overpowering flow, gushing over the rugged rock wall. The streaming water hits the limestones underneath, sounding almost like thunder. The place is a photographer's dream, and makes for a quaint picnic spot for families.

In order to ingratiate the falls to tourists, the Tourism and Civil Aviation Department has constructed a small shed and cafeteria for people to stop for a longer time and take pictures of this natural wonder. 

Seven Sisters Waterfall

Tashi Viewpoint

On a clear day, tourists can avail breathtaking sights of Mt Khangchendzonga and Mt Siniolchu, as well as the colourful villages of North Sikkim, from the Tashi Viewpoint. The Tourism Department of the state has added a resting shed and a park with a small cafeteria so visitors can make a day out of this trip. While sunsets and sunrises are favourable timings, the sun shining down through the clouds at all hours of the day also makes this viewpoint worth a visit. Soak up some sun, gaze out at the valleys and the mountains and look for the Labrang and Phodong monasteries hidden amidst fluffy clouds. 

Grab a cup of warm tea as you soak in the peace and quiet beauty of the Himalayas at Tashi; it’s an unmissable experience for first-time visitors. While there is no admission fee, there are extra charges levied on renting of binoculars, and using the telescope mounted here to get a closer look at the surrounding mountains. The site was built by the late king of Sikkim and lies about 8 km from Gangtok.

Tashi Viewpoint