Jaldapara National Park

This lush national park is situated at the foothills of the Eastern Himalayas and has rich vegetation (primarily tall elephant grass) and a variety of wildlife. The only way to move about in the park is on elephant-back or in a 4x4 safari jeep.

Jaldapara National Park

Chalsa

A small town at the foothills of the Himalayas, Chalsa offers a scenic view of lush green tea gardens, hills, rivers and forests. It is also known as the gateway to the Dooars, and serves as a base for other important hill stations such as Bindu, Jhalong, and Paren, all located on the banks of River Jaldhaka.

Chalsa

Kankrajhor

Kankrajhor comprises a whopping 9,000 hectare of tree-dotted area that includes kusum, shaal, teak etc. The area is also famous for cultivating cashew nuts, coffee and oranges. Not only that, it is also famous for trekking, and offers plenty of scenic locations in its thick forests and vast fields for one to enjoy.

Kankrajhor

Lebong Race Course

Situated on the outskirts of Darjeeling, Lebong Race Course was made in 1885 as a ground for parades. It is the smallest race course in the world with a complete lap measuring 480 yards. It is also one of the highest in the world situated at a height of 1,809 m above the sea level.

Lebong Race Course

Padmaja Naidu Himalayan Zoological Park

Named after Padmaja Naidu, the daughter of Sarojini Naidu, it serves as the central hub for Central Zoo Authority of India's red panda programme, snow leopards, Tibetan wolves and other highly endangered animal species of the Eastern Himalayan region, and is also a member of the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums. With the prime objective of preserving the precious and threatened fauna of the Himalayas, Padmaja Naidu Himalayan Zoological Park was established in 1958.

Today, it is one of the best zoos in the country and is home to species such as the Asiatic black bear, cloud leopard, red panda, goral, blue sheep, civet, Himalayan tahr, jackal, Tibetan wolf, and a variety of deer (musk, barking etc). Reptiles like the star tortoise, amphibians like the Himalayan newt, and birds like the pheasant, myna, jungle fowl, parakeet etc., also call this zoological park home. The leopard breeding centre (closed to the public) attached to the zoo houses the world's largest conserved population of snow leopards.

Padmaja Naidu Himalayan Zoological Park

Lloyd Botanical Garden

Sprawled over about 40 acre of land, Lloyd Botanical Garden is one of the most unique attractions of the city. It is a delight for anyone who wishes to enjoy a vibrant display of nature’s colours. The collection of flora includes alpine plants, arum lilies, geraniums, ash, birch and lilac from China and Japan, in addition to cryptomerias, plums, cherries, magnolias and maples, weeping willows and deodars from Africa and Bulbon plants and cypress from the United States. There are as many as 150 species of cacti and succulents on display at the greenhouse here. While the entire garden is a treasure box for tourists, the Orchadium is especially worth a visit. It houses as many as 2,500 orchids, which include 50 rare varieties. Most of these have been brought here from Singalila National Park, which can be found on the way to Sandakphu, about 75 km away. There are three more distinctive sections – the upper section is where you will find the Darjeeling Himalayan vegetation; the mid-section is home to a large selection of alpine trees, ferns and conifers; and the lower section has the famous weeping willow, named as such for its drooping branches that create the illusion that the tree is weeping! The Lloyd Botanical Garden doesn’t just give you a rundown of present-day flora, it also allows to peep into the prehistoric ages through its two living fossil trees that have been brought to Darjeeling from China. Additionally, there is Student’s Section that has a plethora of literature on the vegetation of the state, a Medical Garden where you can study the different medicinal properties of certain plants, and a Rock Garden where you can take a leisurely stroll as you admire the natural beauty of Sikkim. Named after William Lloyd, a British bank owner, the garden was his gift to the people of Darjeeling, and was established in the year 1878. The main aim of this place is to preserve the indigenous species of rare flora of the Darjeeling Himalayan hill region, Sikkim and its neighbouring areas.

Lloyd Botanical Garden