Himroo

Originally called khuab or little dream, Himroo is a distinctive weaving technique known for its splendour. The fabric used is a combination of cotton and silk and shines with the lustre of satin. The designs and style of Himroo are  unique and famous for good reason. This art form is believed to have originated in Persia. The weaves include plain lines woven in various geometrical designs with motifs drawn from nature, religious verses and portraits of rulers. The weaves also feature patterns of local fruits, flowers, birds and animals. The Himroo shawls have an extra layer of loose silk weft and that is why they are so soft and feel like silk.

The word 'himroo' finds its origin in the Persian language and means similar. This technique was developed as an alternative to the expensive kimkhwab, which was a more luxurious brocade of silk and gold thread that was weaved for royalty mostly. Himroo found its way to Aurangabad during the reign of Mohammad Tughlaq, when he shifted his capital from Delhi to Daulatabad and resettled the weavers from Gujarat, Banaras and Ahmedabad to his new capital.

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Himroo

Paithani Sarees

A Paithani saree is a luxury in itself. It is distinguished by its feature of looking exactly the same on both sides, including the border and the pallu. This saree forms a part of the bridal trousseau in Maharashtra and does not lose its shine over time, unlike other silks. The basic colours that the saree comes in are sky blue, red, yellow, green, magenta and purple, with two dominating colours: one on the saree and the other on the border and the pallu.

This craft dates back to the Satvahana dynasty that ruled from the 2nd century BC to the 2nd century AD. Since it originated in Paithan, in Aurangabad, this fine silk handloom saree derives its name from the town itself. Paithani sarees rose to fame during the Mughal era, especially during the time of Aurangzeb. After suffering a setback during the advent of the British rule, the Peshwas revived the craft in the 17th century. In fact, they settled the weavers in Yeola, which is a hub for Paithani today.

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Paithani Sarees

Kaghzipura

Before the Mongol invaders came to India, Kaghzipura was the only place in India where handmade paper was produced. It was on the paper produced here that the Quran was printed. The unique art of paper-making is about 700 years old, dating back to the times of Muhammad Tughalaq, the Sultan of Delhi.

Kaghzipura

Bidriware

Bidriware is the pride of Bidar, near Aurangabad, and is an indigenous handicraft tradition that garners a lot of admiration and appreciation. Practised on zinc and copper, and inlaid with pure silver or thin sheets, it is a delicate art and remarkably intricate. Bidri items can be found in most arts and crafts shops of Hyderabad and regular tours are organised by local heritage tour companies to Bidar, where visitors can watch the artisans at work. 

The origin of this art form is believed to have been during the reign of the Bahmani sultans, who ruled Bidar in the 14th and 15th centuries. It is said to be an amalgamation of Persian, Arabic and Turkish designs. Though there are no historical records to prove it, many believe that it was brought to India by the followers of Khwaja Muinuddin Chisty, a preacher, in the 12th century.

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Bidriware